Media
Here you can find words, images, video and logos that you can use to talk about WikiHouse. Make sure you credit the named creators, and follow our trademark guidelines.
Last updated 11 / 2022

About WikiHouse

WikiHouse is a modular, zero-carbon building system that aims to make it simple for anyone to design, manufacture and assemble beautiful, high-performance homes and buildings, even if they do not have traditional construction skills. Think Lego, but for real buildings.

It is no secret that if we are to meet the social, economic and environmental challenges of the 21st century, we need to transform the way we build. The legacy methods that are still widely used today, such as brick and concrete, are notoriously slow, wasteful, labour-intensive and carbon-intensive.

Digital manufacturing, combined with the increasing use of bio-based materials such as timber are increasingly bringing about that change.

WikiHouse is part of that transformation, but it is also different, in three key ways.

Easy to build

WikiHouse blocks can be fitted together quickly and precisely, allowing the main structure to be assembled on-site in hours, by almost anyone. This makes it popular with self-builders and small businesses who want to adopt faster, better, more sustainable ways of building.

Distributed manufacturing

Unlike many other manufactured building systems, WikiHouse does not require a multi-million pound factory setup. WikiHouse blocks can be digitally-fabricated using relatively low-cost CNC machines. This means it can be manufactured by a distributed network of small, local businesses, anywhere.

Open source

WikiHouse is completely open source. That means anyone can take the files and freely use them, or improve them. WikiHouse is supported by a global community of designers and engineers, continuously testing and improving the system. By everyone, for everyone.

A brief history of WikiHouse

The WikiHouse project was first started in 2011 by a team at Architecture 00, working in collaboration with Momentum Engineering and Espians. Within weeks, teams and companies from around the world were downloading the files and beginning to use and improve the system.

What began as an experiment has slowly evolved from an idea to a reality. In 2014, with the first houses and buildings now built, the founders decided it was time to create a non-profit organisation, WikiHouse Foundation (now Open Systems Lab) to accelerate development, and to act as custodian of the public goods at the core of the project.

The first system, WikiHouse Wren, has been used by teams around the world to make hundreds of small buildings, including homes, workspaces, schools, garden studios, extensions and leisure structures. It has also been adapted, and has inspired many other innovative technologies designed around the same principles.

In Spring 2022, WikiHouse Skylark was launched. It is the most advanced WikiHouse system to date, and is now being used in projects across the UK and beyond.

This text is licensed as Public Domain. This means you are free to use it or modify it (or any part of it) for any purpose. You do not have to attribute us. Please note that the WikiHouse Trademark is protected and may only be used in accordance with our Trademark guidelines.

Talks and interviews

2 people in high vis clothing carry a WikiHouse beam in a construction site.

WIki Farmhouse construction

Self builders carry timber WikiHouse parts.
Image credit
OSL
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0
2 people wearing high vis clothing look at a WikiHouse assembly guide

Wiki Farmhouse construction

Self builders following WikiHouse assembly instructions
Image credit
OSL
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0
An open laptop in the foreground showing a house design, behind it a CNC machine cuts timber blocks.

Digital design with WikiHouse

WikiHouse buildings are digitally designed with your preferred design software.
Image credit
Rory Gardiner
Licence
Copyright
Closeup of a CNC machine cutting WikiHouse parts out of a sheet of timber.

CNC machine closeup

A CNC machine is used to cut WikiHouse designs.
Image credit
OSL
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0
A CNC machine in a large workshop being used to cut sheets of timber.

Cutting WikiHouse parts with a CNC machine

A CNC machine is all that is needed to cut WikiHouse parts.
Image credit
Rory Gardiner
Licence
Copyright
A large beam is tested in a lab, a machine adds pressure to the beam until it breaks.

Testing of Skylark beam in lab

A structural test carried out at the University of Edinburgh
Image credit
OSL
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0
9 WikiHouses under construction can be seen on a snowy site.

De Stripmaker, Netherlands

Aerial view of the De Streipmaker neighbourhood
Image credit
WikiHouse NL
Licence
Copyright
The frame of a WikiHouse stands in the background. In the foreground a large WikiHouse NL sign can be seen.

De Stripmaker, Netherlands

Building in progress at the De Stripmaker neighbourhood in Almere
Image credit
WikiHouse NL
Licence
Copyright
2 people are looking at architectural drawings on a table. They are inside a workshop.

De Stripmaker, Netherlands

Team inspects architectural drawings at the De Stripmaker WikiHouse neighbourhood project
Image credit
WikiHouse NL
Licence
Copyright
A house chassis is being erected, with a person in the foreground holding a timber frame in place

De Stripmaker, Netherlands

WikiHouse Swift frame installed as part of the De Stripmaker WikiHouse neighbourhood project
Image credit
WikiHouse NL
Licence
Copyright
A one storey high chassis with 2 windows and 2 doors but no roof sits in a large lab testing facility.

Testing of Skylark structure

A WikiHouse Skylark structure undergoes testing at BRE lab
Image credit
OSL
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0
The inside of a small single storey structure with a sloping 'saltbox' roof shape. The interior is entirely bare plywood. The roof blocks have ribs on the underside. To the right of the room, a door is open, revealing blue sky beyond.

WikiPavilion

Interior of the pavilion
Image credit
Open Systems Lab
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0
A flat view of a wall made entirely of plywood. Even though the structure is made of individual blocks, it reads as a single smooth structure. The top of the wall is sloping, revealing trees and sky behind. In the wall is a door, also made of plywood.

WikiPavilion

Back door of WikiPavilion
Image credit
Open Systems Lab
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0
A straight-on view of a wall made of plywood. You can see the detail of the WikiHouse joints.

WikiPavilion

Wall detail showing connectors
Image credit
Open Systems Lab
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0
A man wearing shorts, a hard hat and a hi-vis vest is standing on short set of steps inside a WikiHouse structure. He is fitting a small piece into the top of the wall.

Peaks Barn construction

Inserting connectors on wall blocks
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
A man and a woman are tipping a plywood wall block up and into place. So far, two sides of a structure have been raised. The sun gives the plywood a kind of warm glow.

Peaks Barn construction

Wall blocks erected
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
A close-up of someone's arm as they mallet a 'bow tie' piece into a WikiHouse wall. The sun gives the plywood a kind of warm glow.

Peaks Barn construction

Wall block connectors are put in place
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
An assembler sits on the stairs of a WikiHouse structure, fitting bow-ties into place. The stairs lead to nowhere, because the upper storey has not been added yet. The plywood structure looks bright and straight, compared to the adjacent dry stone wall.

Peaks Barn construction

Entrance and stairs leading to first floor
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0
A straight-on view of a WikiHouse wall. The ribs cast slanting shadows across the surface of the plywood.

Peaks Barn construction

Closeup of a Skylark wall showing bowtie connectors
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
View looking down a stairwell. A man is fitting screws into the side of a plywood staircase. Inside the timber block walls you can see fluffy white insulation, like a thick fleece jacket.

Peaks Barn construction

Stair blocks are secured in place
Image credit
Jack Walls
Licence
Copyright
A view over the top of some WikiHouse wall blocks. Two people are working on the far wall. In the background the green of trees in spring.

Peaks Barn construction

Construction team assemble wall blocks
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
The front door of a 2 storey building clad in larch and with solar panels on the roof.

Peaks Barn

Front door in finished building
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
A window on the second storey of a finished building clad in larch.

Peaks Barn

Window in finished building
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
A finished 2 storey building with a pitched roof. The roof has solar panels.

Peaks Barn

Finished building clad in larch
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
A finished WikiHouse can be seen in the distance across a field in a small village.

Peaks Barn

Finished building seen in the village
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
A finished WikiHouse clad in larch. The building is 2 storeys high and it has a pitched roof where solar panels have been installed. There is a single door to the left and a large garage door on the right hand side,

Peaks Barn

Front of finished building clad in larch
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
A closeup of larch cladding used in the building.

Peaks Barn

Closeup of larch cladding
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
Closeup of he front door of a 2 storey building clad in larch.

Peaks Barn

Closeup of door
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
A finished WikiHouse can be seen in the distance across a field in a row of village houses.

Peaks Barn

Finished building in village
Image credit
Jack Watts
Licence
Copyright
7 Skylark timber blocks stored against a wall

Assembled WikiHouse Skylark blocks

Assembled Skylark blocks in a workshop
Image credit
Pulp Build
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0

Peaks Barn construction timelapse

Roof blocks timelapse
Image credit
Open Systems Lab
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0

WikiPavilion production

A video of the construction of the WikiPavilion in Milton Keynes, UK
Image credit
Pulp Build
Licence
Creative Commons CC BY 4.0

Typography

Most WikiHouse web pages and documents use Inter, an open source typeface designed by Rasmus Anderson.

Please do

A tick mark. Means yes, you can do this.

Use it to refer to the WikiHouse system

You may use these logos to refer to the WikiHouse system, or to describe a project as 'using WikiHouse' or 'based on WikiHouse'.

A tick mark. Means yes, you can do this.

Use it to link to the WikiHouse website

You may use these logos as a link to the WikiHouse website.

A tick mark. Means yes, you can do this.

Alter the single colour of the logo if you wish

You may change the black or white of the logo to another colour, provided you only use one colour, and do not alter the logo in any other way. You may also CNC cut the logo into wood.

A tick mark. Means yes, you can do this.

Display the logo correctly

Choose the correct file format for the medium you are using, and make sure the image is not pixellated, has sufficient contrast with the background and has a clear margin around it.

Please do not

A cross. Means no, you can't do this.

Use it as your logo

You should not use these logos to brand your company, organisation or initiative, even if it is non-profit.

A cross. Means no, you can't do this.

Call yourself WikiHouse

You should not call your company, organisation or any marketed product or service 'WikiHouse' or a similar derivative (such as WikiHouse[Suffix]) unless you have an explicit written agreement with us to do so. Neither should you use a name that is sufficiently similar that it is likely to cause confusion (for example, WikiHomes).

A cross. Means no, you can't do this.

Alter the logo

You should not alter the design or appearance of a logo in any way, except to change the colour from black or white to a single other colour. Neither should you build another logo intended to imitate or echo it.

A cross. Means no, you can't do this.

Imply endorsement or exclusivity

You should not use any logo or the WikiHouse trademark to claim or imply that you are affiliated with, or endorsed by WikiHouse or Open Systems Lab (unless you are, by written agreement, for example as a WikiHouse Manufacturer), and do not claim to represent the WikiHouse project or community as a whole.

Where images are marked 'Copyright', you have the owners permission to use these images for editorial purposes or in presentations, but you must give credit, and you may not alter the images in any way.